Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

17
Jan
17

Then Came Bronson – build that bike!

parks_harleyposter

“Then Came Bronson” was a fun adventure TV series, about a guy on a Harley, driving from town to town and getting into conflicts, and helping out.  It was on the air in 1969-1970 and was great escapist TV.  If you know the show, and want the bike, I found a great website really doing all the work for you and handing you the recipe on a silver Harley!  Here’s an excerpt from the first page! If you want to build one, go to the site HERE and enjoy all the fun detail work that was done and shared!

“You will need to find a 1968 or 1969 XLH 883cc Harley Davidson Sportster. Your model must have a battery and points. (Not a magneto model)Since the Pilot aired in March of 1969 the bikes used in the pilot were probably 1968 XLH’s. The location schedules denote November 1968 for filming. The TV series episodes used possibly hold over 1968 models from the pilot and the 1969 XLH’s, pictured left, were purchased at the Salinas Harley-Davidson dealership. Any 1967, 68, 69 or 70 XLH will do. The kick start Bronson used was added later to give the bike a more mechanical touch and nostalgic attitude.

Note: Back then the bike was advertised as a 900cc, however this was a marketing technique used by Harley-Davidson when they rounded up the cc from 883 to 900, making the engine appear bigger than it really was. The bike above is the rare Boat-tail model. One of Peter’s many bikes.The 1970 Cycle Guide Magazine article gives evidence of what is required…. “A Harley-Davidson CH gas tank replaced the standard turtle tank. The front wheel was replaced with a 21” aluminum rim carrying a 3.00 x 21 ribbed Avon Speedmaster tire. The front fender was changed to a chromeplated, bobbed piece and the headlight nacelle, or housing, was removed and a chrome sports light replaced it. The oil tank and rear shock springs were chrome plated. A kickstart was added although the Sportster carries an electric starter. The seat was replaced with a custom leather unit and a short chrome hand-hold was mounted behind the passenger seat. (Folklore has it that the sissy bar was cobbled from a Schwinn banana seat bicycle – ed.) The chain guard cover and the voltage regulator cover were chrome plated. The rear fender was bobbed 5 inches and the tail light replaced with an old style English light. The motorcycle was repainted with a specially mixed formula which is called from this point on, Bronson Red. The final touch was the addition of the Bronson “Eye” insignia to the gas tank.”The 883’s pictured here below are a 1970 XLH and 1969, a kick starter was added later. A 1970 has a slightly different front fork because of the way the front fender mounts, but can be adapted by welding tabs on the forks for the Bronson front fender. A vintage XLH is hard to find now-a-days. Once you have your bike, move on to another step.”

12
Jan
17

Rockford, KITT, Bandit and Bumblebee in Charlotte Motor Speedway 4/6/2017

Rockford Files Firebird to be Displayed at Charlotte AutoFair

This April 6th through 9th 2017, at the Charlotte Motor Speedway, a Rockford Firebird will be on display. They are celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Firebird and Camaro’s.

KITT from Knight Rider and the Smokey and the Bandit Trans Am will also be on display with some significant Firebirds and Camaro’s.

The Bumble Bee Camaro from the 1st Transformer movie will be there too. This Bumble Bee Camaro is from the Volo Auto Museum collection.

They are expecting over 100,00 people to attend. So here is a link to the shows information. http://www.charlottemotorspeedway.com/tickets/spring-autofair/

21
Jul
16

The Batmobile no one drove… Part 4

By Nate Truman

(Part 1 is found HERE!)

By waiting and buying the perfect donor car, I had jumped over months of work! I skipped taking the car to and from shops, and haggling over price and workmanship.  So I found myself in a great place starting with the fun  details and the finish work!

After registration with the DMV, looking for insurance, it was time to go over the car.

I went through all the paperwork to see what had been done.  As the dash was all custom, I had to get acquainted with all the switches, find the fuse box, etc.

The door handles had no locks, but I had been given a set of new replacement hot rod handles.

There were no windshield wipers.

A gas leak had emerged from the rear of the car.

The trunk wouldn’t open, and it had no lever, just an electronic switch.

The battery was dying because the lights would come on when I had the door open, but the battery was locked tight in the trunk!

The door handle could be a blog by itself!  Figuring out how to remove a door panel in a “regular” car is hard enough, but a hot rod with custom interior, shaved doors, custom glass and reversed hinges proved to be a long learning curve!  After many attempts I finally got the interior panel off, only to discover why the new handles had never been installed.  There was no way to get to them!! Surrounded by sharp metal, there was a clamp like paperclip to hold the handle together. A custom metal piece held the handle in place with two screws.  If you removed the screws, it fell down into the door with a thunk.  So I used magnets, dental instruments, tiny clamps along with a lot of sweat and attempts to finally operate on the driver door and successfully replaced the door handle.  After not being sure if I would ever get the door to close and latch again,  I decided to wait on replacing the passenger side for now.  I had an interior lock on that side, so I could at least key lock the car now.  wp-1469070448128.jpg

Next I knew I needed some bat hubcaps to replace the jag emblems, and a bat in the steering wheel if I was going to keep that.  It came with what I think was the original horn, but was rusted beyond recognition.  I will try and restore, but it may be hopeless.

wp-1469070359281.jpg I would have to find a 1940’s police siren anyway, you know, for crimefighting!     Also I wanted to make another big bat somewhere on the motor, and the whole dash needed the batman treatment! To the Bat-garage photos!!

 

So first things first, off with the Jag center caps, on with some period bats I designed and cut by my friend, the late great Eddie Paul.  (He was my “brain builder” and we had started the project a few weeks before his passing.  I love that guy, and I am proud that his talented hands worked on this final project.  He will be sorely missed.)

wp-1469068025636.jpgI swapped out the Jaguar logo for a bat in the steering wheel, until such time as I want to swap it to either a banjo type classic wheel (They are very big, so not leaning that way) or some other custom bat wheel! A custom car is never finished!

The couple of drawings in the comics of the dash in the car were a brown dash of the basic variety, (The shot above was the most detailed drawing of the era) but I know bat fans wouldn’t go for just a plain dash!  So out it all came, and I wrapped it in bat black, added a ww2 aircraft panel and dug into my magic box of switches and dials.  I had to have a FEW bat-gadgets! Just for me!  I moved the stereo into the glove box so the modern stereo couldn’t be seen, but I could still play batman music!

Ace the Bathound stood guard by the car most days, powered by what else?  Gentle Giant Dog food, created by Burt Ward!

Remember that shot from the 40’s cop car? Well, I got a ww2 hand unit to connect to the dash, and a period linesman phone for when Batman had to make a call.  With this piece of crime fighting equipment, Batman could clip into any phone line anywhere, and dial anyone, while being untraceable!  It was very nostalgic to spin the dial and have that feeling again to make a call!  I know it will be a fun attraction to show kids!

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Found the smallest blades 9″ and the smallest arms from a 70’s VW bug.  Batman’s ready for the storm!  The car was sliced in the back and the front of the roof was lowered, so the windshield had to be custom cut and it’s not very tall!

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Finally I made a bat for the back wall like in the toy, but I dropped it on the air cleaner, and liked it way better there. wp-1469070468922.jpg I had one spot in the dash I didn’t have figured out, but once that was filled in I could reinstall the dash.  Then I would have a cool bat themed hot rod, ready to take to car shows!  I think I have to start driving this thing soon!  Sorry for the cliffhanger, but that’s all for now!

Next episode:  Making custom side panels, getting that dash back in and working, sourcing and making side pipes and figuring out the giant bat-face, with light up eye headlights!  Stay tuned bat-fans, this may take some time!

19
Jul
16

The Batmobile no one ever drove… part 3

The Batmobile no one ever drove… Part 3  Pulling the trigger!

In the custom or “Kustom” world, hot rodders of every shape and size spend their time, talents and money building their dream cars. They change their minds, start over, give up, and some actually finish their weekend warriors!   From “Rat Rods” to “Trailer Queens” lifted, slammed, the list goes on and on of all the directions customizing a car can go.  It’s the beauty of the hobby.   If you have ever been to a car show you have seen chromed engine compartments costing thousands of dollars.  Lifted trucks, lowered chevys, rusted racers – each one is someone’s dream ride. It’s what they wanted to bring into the world of cars.

Some guys have been in the game a long time, and now just “fix and flip” cars they know.  Get a heap, hot rod it up and sell it – then repeat. Mainly because very few of us can afford to keep every car we think is cool!

During my search for a donor “beater” or “Project” car, I had kept my eye on one amazing build that was perfect for my dream.   It was out of my price range and it was just too darn pretty!  But it had everything I wanted and more.     It had been on a journey before I saw it though.  Starting out as a project 1939 Dodge – it got the NHRA frame off overhaul.  New chassis, 400 hp motor, and a builder who was willing to tinker to get a car the way he wanted it.

First a new chassy, and a new crate 400 hp motor was built for the base. The car and body was stripped clean.  You can see in one photo there was a blower on the motor. That’s part of the process, trying looks and ideas, and then deciding to keep them or not!

Here is a set of different ideas for the front of the car. Swapping out original air vents, then sealing them up. The dodge had a center hinged hood, but it was converted to a solid one piece.  Had I found this car for sale, it would have been on the top of my donor list even at this point!

Custom side panels were made, then discarded, and another front grill was designed.

These are not in chronological order, but a few shots to show the body work being done to smooth it all out for paint.  A custom licence plate indent was added by the Rodfathers.

Lots of handwork, rust repair and sanding, priming and sanding again, until it was ready for paint!  wp-1468007063803.jpg

The builder/owner even took a black marker to a photo, to see what it would look like in black, with rear wheel skirts!

build photos

The whole process of searching for a project and seeing it through to your finished vision is a long and costly process.   Lots of work and yet another grill this time built by Dean Jeffries brought it all together!    Finishing touches of pinstriping and a new modern interior were added.  All the unique ideas and skills of many hands brought this new car to life!  Once done, it was taken to car shows and just “bombed around in” for a few years like this and enjoyed!    However, once a project is finished and driven for a while eventually it’s time to sell and move on to the next project!

I had watched the craigslist ad for months but never bothered to see the car because it’s list price was fair, but out of the range of what I wanted to spend on the project.  I was also in the mindset of doing a build up of a project car.    But then one day I was appearing in a parade in Burbank, and even though I knew it was too finished and the price was out of my budget I decided to go look at it in person.  The shots of the interior were so spot on to what I would do to match the Batmobile red stripes, I just had to see it in person.

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Suicide doors, check! Red and black interior with custom point, SUPER CHECK! 

 

400 hp Crate HOT ROD motor and transmission pro installed, CHECK!

 

Cool from every angle? Oh yeah!

 

Super cool modded body with great paint, and custom red and black wheels? Check!  I fell for this car.  It was just too nice! The list of mods I would have to do to get it to MY dream car, was pretty short.  Just all the fun stuff!  I started making mental lists of what I would have to do with a few areas, like with the trunk, when I added a giant bat fin.

trunk open

And the dash was going to have to be bat-upgraded.  The steering wheel was out of a late model Jag, and there were Jag emblems on the wheels, and a Dodge emblem on the dash. Great signs that the car was a toy that had been played with and enjoyed!

Lots of fun modern upgrades, like courtesy lights all around, AC!!, hot rod door handles.driver side pedals

A beautiful headliner! How to add a fin without destroying it?

celing interior

The owner had been trying to sell for a couple years, and for various reasons needed it sold ASAP.  I knew I would never find a car like this again, one where so much of the work I was planning on doing was already done!  After a day or two of deliberation – this beauty was in my batcave!!    wp-1468955738069.jpg

And just as the modder before me, I had to do a quick sketch to see what my ideas might look like, down the road!

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Let the Bat-transformation begin!    Stay tuned bat-fans, the best is yet to come!

PART FOUR:  The rise of the 1940’s N8mobile  “I like to personalize all my toys”

08
Jul
16

The Batmobile no one ever drove, part 2

on black 1940_batmobile

The building of the 1940 Style N8MOBILE part 2!  Read part one HERE!

By Nate Truman

How do you take an idea of a never built car and get to a finished car that’s legal to drive down the highway?  Focus.  Desire.  Time.  Creativity, and of course, CASH!  I had a lot of the first four, but not an unlimited amount of the last one.  Besides, if I had unlimited amounts of money I could just go to a custom shop and say “BUILD THIS” and throw money at them.  That’s a terrible journey.

I did also have a few rules: Rule #1. As a son of a “Car Guy” I knew a few things I shouldn’t do.  DON’T destroy a car that can be restored to it’s original condition. These are also known as OS, Original Steel.   I wouldn’t use a car like this because they are rare and if there is someone out there that wants to restore a car back to it’s original look, it should go to them.  So it had to be a car that would be near impossible to take back to stock.

Rule #2. RUST will drain your wallet.  Cars from 1939-42 are 75 years old. Rust happens and it costs a LOT to repair.  I don’t like to do it, I don’t want to do it, it’s not fun.  SO I must have a  car with no rust or the rust already repaired.

Rule #3. The closer the donor car is to your idea of a finished product the fewer variables there are to get it there.  This basically means that if a car has some costly work done the way I want it done, that’s a fixed price.  A finished interior or installed motor, etc. is work that is paid for in the purchase price.   It’s very easy to get way over budget by hoping for the best prices and no problems and then end up thousands of dollars in higher costs because of unforeseen problems along the way.   A cheaper donor car can often mean a lot more expensive finished car. Ask any Knight Rider replica builder!

I spent months scanning craigslist for about an hour a night.  I started seeing some cars that didn’t sell for months.  I figured out what was a good price, what was way too high, and what was a deal.  I didn’t buy anything, I didn’t go see anything, I was just learning. I was an expert on other cars, but not this era.

The odd part about this search was that I wasn’t looking for a specific make and model!    Ford, Dodge, Cadillac, Plymouth and Chevy were all on the table.  Details I had to have: 2 door coupes, with two windows on each side. Headlights incorporated into the fenders. That would eliminate a lot of cars.  For between 6-18 grand there were lots of choices of “heaps”.  That means it’s a body, and a HEAP of parts!   Maybe an engine inside, some ran, some were in great shape, others were barely cars.

I considered a lot of cars, but I knew I had to be patient to find the perfect donor car. I didn’t mind doing the interior exactly how I wanted it, but that opened me up to lots of cost overruns. These kinds of cars can be an endless project of broken parts and unknown problems.  I wasn’t going to pull the trigger until the perfect car showed up.  Besides, shopping for cars is pretty much the only shopping I consider “fun”!

As time passed, I found a few good possibilities.  I was searching about a 1000 mile radius, so if I just wanted to get a better  idea of the actual condition of the car, I would ask a friend who lived closer to go take a look at it for me.

Unfortunately, rust and the state of disrepair made most of them unsuitable.  In fact, the more I looked at the “heaps” the more I realized that starting that far down the ladder would really open me up to a lot of frustration, and money spent with little to show for it.  So I changed my parameters of my search.  Still 1939-1942, but now I added “Hot rod” or “Kustom”.    I started seeing chopped and channeled projects, cars with motors replaced with newer more reliable and powerful motors, and for about the same price as the “heaps”.

 

I was finding many more cars that fit my specific bill, and a few that I started looking at hard.  The best one was in Northern California, and a hot rod guy had started building a big horsepower 1/4 mile race car.  I didn’t want or need a car that was “tubbed” with 800 hp, but he had to stop his build for personal reasons, and it was at just about the point where I wanted to take over.  Motor and tranny were brand new and mostly installed, and the body was mostly straight. I loved the overall look of the car.  So we started to email back and forth, looking for any problems, haggling over price, and figuring out transportation.  I thought I had found THEE donor car for my Bat build.

 

I didn’t like the single window in the back, but I had toyed with the idea of just sealing that up.  Challenges:  A few missing panels, missing glass, ZERO interior other than a cage and a couple of really low racing seats.   At this point in the journey is when the rational mind needs to step in!  I really wanted to get started and this was the best donor I had found up to that time.  The price was fair, and I sensed he would go even lower, giving me some financial room to finish it my way without breaking the bank.  But there was the window, and several “mostly’s”.  I did some math, looked at how much I would have to do, and what would have to be undone. It just didn’t add up.  I sighed, and took a pass.  At the time I was disappointed, but in the long run it was a great decision to let someone else finish this for the race track, and wait for the street driver I wanted.  Another old rule, don’t spend ANY money for starter cars or cool extras that make your project less accurate to your idea. 800 horse power! Tubbed! Cool!! But I had to remind myself, not on my want list.  The search continued on…

NEXT PART 3: Nate finds the right car to get started!

14
Apr
16

The making of a “REAL” Batmobile batcave!

Sometimes when you make your dreams come true, it triggers other projects you never imagined.  For me, when I finished my full size street legal Batmobile, I  now needed a safe place to park it.  Sure, a locked garage, but not just any garage!

Obviously, I needed a batcave!  Here’s a short rundown on how I built it.
So first I had to do some investigating, to see what was supposed to be in the batcave, and what elements I would want to include in mine.

 

 

All Done... Sort of!

Completion day! Well, it’s never finished, but this was a big day. My Bat-mechanic had done a great job, paint, wheels, and windshield – I was ready to fight crime!bat on beach
Nate Truman’s Batmobile at the local beach! Surf competition with the Joker!

Batman1943serial03

The first time a “REAL” batcave was shown, in the original “Batman” serial films. Basically a desk, some chairs and a bat on the wall.

batcave

Several Batcave toys were made after the 60’s TV series was such a huge hit. Sliding down a batpole was the fastest way to get to the cave, but Alfred used the hidden stairs!

 

Over the decades there have been many Batcave toy sets, and some great “virtual” batcaves in drawings, cartoons and even video games.

In this new world thanks to the internet I have discovered that much of my “starcar” and crossgeeking work has usually been done already by someone else! I started a pinterest page to collect everything I would want in my dream batcave.

In my searches I did stumble across a great blog on the batcave and instead of reposting and commenting, I will just link to it. Great history and development over the years with photos and drawings.  And for a quick history from youtube of the “Bat’s Cave” you can watch this video!

FLAME ON!

Testing the afterburners in the batcave.

terry austin. batman's new home. 001

I doubt anyone would build a building like this, a lot of wasted space! But he could be Bruce on the top level, and under the building was a “in town” batcave!

One of the great mysteries in the Batman storyline is how did the batcave get built? Alfred? I don’t think so. The latest cave has levels that even Batman doesn’t know what is down there! So many adventures have included a trip to the batcave, or a fight, a new way in or out that it seems it would have to be part magic to do everything the comics have shown us. As much as I would like a beautifully decorated giant trophy room (I think there is a bit of Fortress of Solitude envy going on there) to stay in the realm of almost reality, the best versions are utilitarian.

The secret batcaves around the city, one under the Wayne Tower are the most useful. If Wayne manor is outside the city, Batman’s response time would be pretty bad, no matter how fast the batmobile or batplane/gyrocopter may be. As for a high speed rail car that diverts trains so he can use the subway systems? That seems pretty unworkable. To remove the need for a team of helpers to get him to the scene of the crime, everything seems to use “auto pilot” where planes, and cars can just drive home, or hover until needed. Then they have to have anti-theft out the wazoo to keep criminals from just taking them as they sit unprotected.

So as my house doesn’t sit on top of a huge underground cavern (saving MILLIONS in excavation costs) I had to settle for something smaller. A two car garage hidden behind gates, and about 500 square feet of bat-office space.

Also, Batman has more storage room, and I am guessing he doesn’t have to keep all the Christmas decorations, various holiday stuff and old furniture in his cave, but I do. So no turntable for the batmobile (with a car almost 20 feet long, it wasn’t doable. I checked. And Rechecked. Rats.) But the batcave that would be my design style was obvious, the TV batcave from the 1960’s TV series.

49d413dac1542e86aaf509c8814559e7 batcave off set

Adam West Batmobile Nate truman

The Man, ADAM WEST! We did a turtle wax commercial that never made air. Having Batman polish my batmobile all day, PRICELESS!

So I started building my list:
A smaller trophy cabinet is just fine to display memories.
Basic automotive tools,
bat-compressor,
some storage bat shelves,
bat-costume cleaning machines,
bat-computer area,
bat-workbench,
a big screen BAT-TV,
bat-sound system,
security devices. The list will never be finished, as many items have all ready been upgraded since my batcave has been built. But little by little, with no help from Alfred, I put together a pretty workable, secret lair to assist in my crime fighting and keep the batmobile hidden and ready for action. As well as a place to keep all the Christmas decorations! Ok, so I am no where near as “Dark” – this is the 60’s batman after all!
And Adam West isn’t always available to polish my car!

Now most “mancaves” are designed to be pleasant from a male perspective, and mostly about relaxing and entertainment. But there is no place for alcohol, dart games and neon in a batcave! Batman would have Protein shakes, Batarang practice target and a batsymbol instead!

(Of course there is always room for bat gadgets and batmobile toys!)

So after gathering info, photos, and ideas for my batcave, it was time to build the real deal, and at a perfect time, as the Batmobile was out getting it’s paint job done – I had room to work!     Stay tuned batfans, the best is yet to come!!!!  PART 2    The Building of the working Batcave!

 

11
Jul
15

is it the Nemo car or Nautilus-mobile? Nemo mobile? League of Extraordinary Gentlemen car? I just call it AMAZING!

Cobbled together by Nate Truman

I have been following many star car builds over the years, and one of the most exciting and ambitious is Ken Freeman’s scratchbuilt replica of the Nemo car from “The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen,” which took him nearly five years to build.

The original movie car designed by Carol Spier, who also penned Captain Nemo’s Nautilus for the movie, is the four-door six-wheeled fiberglass-bodied 22-foot-long Nemo car (Nautilus car too, but NOT the Nemomobile) was built on a Land Rover fire tender chassis with an extra axle up front and a Land Rover V-8 engine for power, a removeable hardtop, and elaborate Hindu decoration, particularly on the front and interior of the car. Two were reportedly built for the production, though the studio fitted one of the two with extensive rigging for interior shots.

nemo screen car

 

Here is a shot from the film, with one of the two original cars built for the film.

The Nemo car used in filming has since been sold at auction, and here is what it looked like before the sale.

Rather than a Land Rover, Freeman started with a pair of 1979 Cadillac Fleetwood limousines which he then combined into one chassis, powered by a Cadillac 425-cu.in. V-8 and Turbo-Hydramatic 400 automatic transmission driving the rear wheels!

double axle

Like the original, the body that Freeman built for the car was made from fiberglass, though his measures 24 feet long and a little narrower than the original at 102 inches. The decorative work he created himself first by sculpting it out of Spanish clay, then taking molds and casting the end result “in aluminum filled resins and cold-cast plated in aluminum and pewter, and further trimmed in bronze, brass, and 18k gold.  This is truly an accomplishment in workmanship and attention to details.  A tremendous project and well executed!

nemo_12_12_12_003_by_dentman65-d5yrc7qnemo_build_progress_by_dentman65-d4gckgnnemo_engine_by_dentman65-d65gx8hnemo_june_2013_021_by_dentman65-d6dk23anemo_s_car_beginnings_by_dentman65-d65h2dsnemo_s_car_construction_by_dentman65-d65h34snemo_s_car_rear_view_by_dentman65-d65gzjnnemo_s_front_elephants_by_dentman65-d6f8wjibuilding_nemo_car_street_rod_by_dentman65-d5k9l88captain_nemos_car_from_lxg_by_dentman65-d4gfzswfrontlxg_car_nemo_by_dentman65-d49pz9uNemocar_03_2000

 

Nemocar_02_2000

Ken Freeman is a body shop owner from West End, North Carolina.  He put about 6,500 hours of work into the car—which he calls the Spirit of Nemo—over the last 4-1/2 years, interrupted at one point by a fire in his shop! Undaunted, he recently finished the car, calling it “more art than automobile” and claiming it to be the first and only replica of the Nemo car.  I sure wish he lived in Hollywood, so we could do starcar events together, I hope to see his amazing work of art someday, but until then I will just have to stare at the photos and marvel at the amount of work he did to drive his dream car! Congrats Ken!  

Here’s a short video to see it in action, and hear from Ken himself!

 




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